NPKUA FUNDED RESEARCH

The NPKUA is pleased to highlight the 2015 Research Awards. These awards are made possible by our member organizations who raise funds each year on the local level for research. Thank you for helping make these awards possible as we work towards improving treatment options for PKU and accelerating the timeline for a cure.

The overall funding strategy of the NPKUA is to support projects that will promote advances in the treatment and management of PKU, with the long term goal of facilitating the development of a cure. The NPKUA has a Scientific Advisory Board made up of eminently qualified doctors, researchers and clinicians that evaluate the proposals and provide a recommendation to the NPKUA Board each year for funding.

Impact of Funding

The last six years have seen great strides in finding ways to improve treatment for PKU. We are pleased to share our annually funded research awards that focus on new and innovative treatment options for PKU and accelerating the timeline for a cure.

Click here for a list of the 2010
Research Awards.

Click here for a list of the 2011
Research Awards.

Click here for a list of the 2012
Research Awards.

Click here for a list of the 2013
Research Awards.

Click here for a list of the 2014
Research Awards.

Click here for a list of the 2015
Research Awards.

2015 Research Awards

Katherine Durrer-Deming, MS, at the University of North Texas was awarded a grant with Dr. Michael Allen to continue their work in developing a genetically engineered probiotic to treat PKU.

Dr. Paulo Roque Lino, at iMed.ULisboa (Research Institute for Medicines, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lisbon, Portugal) was awarded a fellowship to focus on the development of an Enzyme Reposition Therapy approach to PKU

Dr. Robert Nicholls, Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Medical Genetics at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC proposes to develop an improved, clinically relevant animal model, a swine, for PKU in order to study and understand the biomedical bases and to develop therapies for the metabolic disease.

Dr. Eddy van derZee,  at the University of Groningen and at the University Medical Center of Groningen in The Netherlands and his team are studying the effects of Large Neutral Amino Acids (LNAA) on phe levels and neurotransmitters in the brains of PKU mice.

Dr. Roberto Gramignoli was the first NPKUA post-doctoral fellow at UPMC under the supervision of Dr. Stephen Strom working on the hepatocyte transplant project with the PKU mouse model.

Dr. Kristen Skvorak at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center will continue with her study of transplanting human amnion epithelial (hAE) stem cells in the PKU mouse model.

Click here for full summaries of the 2015 research projects.

 


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